Between January 2000 and March 2001, approximately 6,000 Russian women entered Korea through Busan port and Gimpo.In 2000, 3,064 Russians entered South Korea on E-6 visas, 2,927 of them women (Jhoty, 2001).South Korean officials are also trying to get rid of the prostitution, if you read the statistics.

South Korea (Korean: 한국, 韓國 Hanguk) [1], formally the Republic of Korea (대한민국, 大韓民國 Daehan Minguk) is a country in East Asia.

South Korea occupies the southern half of the Korean Peninsula, with North Korea to the north, China across the sea to the west and Japan a short ferry ride to the southeast.

Prostitution in South Korea is illegal, but according to The Korea Women's Development Institute, the sex trade in Korea was estimated to amount to 14 trillion South Korean won ($13 billion) in 2007, roughly 1.6 percent of the nation's gross domestic product.

46,000 brothels operate within the prostitution industry within South Korea.

The number of prostitutes dropped by 18 percent to 269,000 during the same period.

The sex trade involved some 94 million transactions in 2007, down from 170 million in 2002.

The amount of money traded for prostitution was over 14 trillion won, much less than 24 trillion won in 2002.

Despite legal sanctions and police crackdowns, prostitution continues to flourish in South Korea, while sex workers continue to actively resist the state's activities.

Hundreds of thousands of Chinese women (both Han and Korean Chinese) are engaged in the prostitution businesses such as hotel, massage parlor, noraebang room, room salon and so on in Korea.

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, young Russian girls have been commonly seen in the red district of Korea.

They can be found in the bars, strip club and coffee shop for entertaining the customers.